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Source: The Alamo Defenders.

This list contains names of Sevier County men who are known to have died in defense of the Alamo. For more information on the Alamo defenders, see The Handbook of Texas On-Line, a project of the Texas State Historical Association.

BAYLISS, JOSEPH (1808-1836). Joseph Bayliss, Alamo defender, son of John and Patience Bayliss, was born in Tennessee in 1808. He traveled as a single man to Texas in January 1836 and enlisted in the Volunteer Auxiliary Corps of Texas at Nacogdoches. He went to the Alamo as a member of Capt. William B. Harrison's company, which included David Crockett. Bayliss died in the battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Daughters of the American Revolution, The Alamo Heroes and Their Revolutionary Ancestors (San Antonio, 1976). Daughters of the Republic of Texas, Muster Rolls of the Texas Revolution (Austin, 1986). Bill Groneman, Alamo Defenders (Austin: Eakin, 1990). Phil Rosenthal and Bill Groneman, Roll Call at the Alamo (Fort Collins, Colorado: Old Army, 1985).


BLAIR, JOHN (1803-1836). John Blair, Alamo defender, was born in Tennessee in 1803. On February 19, 1835, he registered as a married man for a league of land in Texas. He may have been one of the volunteers who accompanied James Bowie to Bexar and the Alamo in early 1836. Louis Rose, who left the Alamo before the final battle, later testified that he "Left [John Blair] in the Alamo 3 March 1836." Blair died in the battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Robert Bruce Blake, "A Vindication of Rose and His Story," in In the Shadow of History, ed. J. Frank Dobie, Mody C. Boatright, and Harry H. Ransom (Publications of the Texas Folklore Society 15, Detroit: Folklore Association, 1939). Daughters of the American Revolution, The Alamo Heroes and Their Revolutionary Ancestors (San Antonio, 1976). Bill Groneman, Alamo Defenders (Austin: Eakin, 1990).


BLAIR, SAMUEL (1807-1836). Samuel Blair, Alamo defender and officer of the Alamo garrison, was born in Tennessee in 1807. He registered as a single man for a quarter league of land in the Power and Hewetson colony on August 4, 1834. On September 10, 1834, he registered for a headright of land in James McGloin's colony. Blair took part in the siege of Bexar. He later served in the Alamo garrison as assistant to the ordnance chief, Robert Evans, with the rank of captain. He died in the battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Daughters of the American Revolution, The Alamo Heroes and Their Revolutionary Ancestors (San Antonio, 1976). Daughters of the Republic of Texas, Muster Rolls of the Texas Revolution (Austin, 1986). Bill Groneman, Alamo Defenders (Austin: Eakin, 1990). Texas General Land Office, An Abstract of the Original Titles of Record in the General Land Office (Houston: Niles, 1838; rpt., Austin: Pemberton Press, 1964).


BOWMAN, JESSE (1785-1836). Jesse Bowman, Alamo defender, was born in Tennessee in 1785. By 1811 he was in Illinois, where he made his living as a trapper and hunter. His son Joseph was born in Illinois. Bowman, his wife, and three children became the first known settlers of Camden, Ouachita County, Arkansas, in 1824. Four years later they moved to Hempstead, Arkansas. In the 1830s Bowman, his son, and his brother and nephews immigrated to Texas and received land in Red River County. Bowman and his son served in the Texas army during the Texas Revolution. As a member of the Alamo garrison, Bowman died in the battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Daughters of the American Revolution, The Alamo Heroes and Their Revolutionary Ancestors (San Antonio, 1976). Files, Daughters of the Republic of Texas Library, San Antonio. Bill Groneman, Alamo Defenders (Austin: Eakin, 1990).


CAMPBELL, ROBERT (1810-1836). Robert Campbell, Alamo defender, was born in Tennessee in 1810. He moved to Texas in January 1836 and obtained a commission as lieutenant in the Volunteer Auxillary Corps. He traveled to the Alamo as an officer of Capt. William B. Harrison's company of volunteers, which included David Crockett. Campbell died in the battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Daughters of the American Revolution, The Alamo Heroes and Their Revolutionary Ancestors (San Antonio, 1976). Bill Groneman, Alamo Defenders (Austin: Eakin, 1990). John H. Jenkins, ed., The Papers of the Texas Revolution, 1835-1836 (10 vols., Austin: Presidial Press, 1973). Phil Rosenthal and Bill Groneman, Roll Call at the Alamo (Fort Collins, Colorado: Old Army, 1985). Amelia W. Williams, A Critical Study of the Siege of the Alamo and of the Personnel of Its Defenders (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas, 1931; rpt., Southwestern Historical Quarterly 36 (April 1933), 37 (July, October 1933, January, April 1934).


GARRETT, JAMES GIRARD (1806-1836). James Girard Garrett, Alamo defender, was born in Tennessee in 1806. He was a resident of Louisiana when he marched to Texas as a member of Capt. Thomas H. Breece's company of New Orleans Greys in 1835. Garrett took part in the siege of Bexar and later served in the Alamo garrison. He died in the battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Daughters of the American Revolution, The Alamo Heroes and Their Revolutionary Ancestors (San Antonio, 1976). Daughters of the Republic of Texas, Muster Rolls of the Texas Revolution (Austin, 1986). Bill Groneman, Alamo Defenders (Austin: Eakin, 1990).


MARSHALL, WILLIAM (1808-1836). William Marshall, Alamo defender, was born in Tennessee in 1808 and was a resident of Arkansas at the time of the Texas revolution. He came to Texas as a member of Capt. Thomas H. Breece's company of New Orleans Greys, took part in the siege of Bexar, and later served in the Alamo garrison as a member of Capt. William Blazeby's infantry company. Marshall died in the battle of the Alamo on March 6, 1836. No bounty or donation land was ever recorded in his name.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Daughters of the American Revolution, The Alamo Heroes and Their Revolutionary Ancestors (San Antonio, 1976). Daughters of the Republic of Texas, Muster Rolls of the Texas Revolution (Austin, 1986). Bill Groneman, Alamo Defenders (Austin: Eakin, 1990).

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